Welcome to FIS   Sponsored By
Subscribe to FIS | Register with FIS | Advertise with FIS | Newsletter | About FIS | Contact us
   


Chinook salmon. (Photo: NOAA)

2015’s ocean conditions may cause poor juvenile chinook salmon return

Click on the flag for more information about United States UNITED STATES
Tuesday, March 21, 2017, 01:50 (GMT + 9)

Researchers from Oregon State University (OSU) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) forecast this year there will be a slightly below-average run of spring chinook salmon on the Columbia River.

These predictions are based on the fact that ocean conditions were historically bad in the spring of 2015, when migrating yearling fish that will comprise the bulk of this spring’s adult chinook salmon run first went out to sea.

Besides, Pacific Decadal Oscillation values – which reflect warm and cold sea surface temperatures – suggest it was one of the warmest nearshore oceans encountered by migrating chinook salmon dating back to at least 1900.

Researchers believe that the lack of food for the salmon in 2015 may have resulted in significant mortality that will show in this year’s run of Columbia River springers.

“When juvenile salmon first enter the ocean, it is a critical time for them. They are adjusting to a saltwater environment, they have to eat to survive, and they have to avoid becoming prey themselves. When we sampled juvenile salmon in May and June of 2015, the fish were much smaller and thinner than usual, and many of them had empty stomachs. There just wasn’t anything for them to eat,” pointed out lead author Elizabeth Daly, a senior faculty research assistant with the Cooperative Institute for Marine Resource Studies, jointly operated by OSU and NOAA out of the Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport.

The researcher explained that when the oceanic waters off Oregon and Washington are cold, young salmon primarily feed on readily available fish prey such as Pacific sand lance and smelts, which triggers their growth spurt. When waters are warmer, there is less food available, and they primarily eat juvenile anchovies and rockfish, which are less-desirable prey than cold-water species.

By the time the juvenile chinook salmon migrated to the ocean in spring in 2015, the larval anchovies and rockfish had all but disappeared – making even backup food sources for the salmon scarce.

The researchers theorize that these larval fish died off because they themselves had little to eat. Long-time NOAA biologist Bill Peterson told Daly and her colleagues that the Pacific Ocean off the Northwest coast in early 2015 was devoid of cold-water, lipid-rich copepods, a key element in the food chain. In 2015, it was so warm offshore that virtually no lipid-rich copepods were to be found.

“During warm years, there is typically less upwelling that brings cold, nutrient-rich water to the surface,” said Richard Brodeur, a biologist with the NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center and co-author on the study. “Salmon populations may be able to handle one year of warm temperatures and sparse food. But two or three years in a row could be disastrous.”

“For the first time, we found that the salmon were eating juvenile sardines in 2016 – a new prey for them,” Daly noted. “Sardines were spawning off the central Oregon coast for one of the first times because of the warm water. We don’t know the long-term impact this will have on salmon. Hopefully, it can become a new food source for them if waters remain warm.”

As this year’s run of spring chinook salmon unfolds on the Columbia River, Daly and her colleagues will be watching to see if the numbers of adult fish returning align with predictions of a poor return based on 2015 ocean conditions, prey availability, and juvenile fish size.


[email protected]
www.fis.com

Photo Courtesy of FIS Member  National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA/NMFS
 Print


Click to know how to advertise in FIS
MORE NEWS
Spain
Aug 23, 23:20 (GMT + 9):
Spanish fleet could have less hake in 2018
South Africa
Aug 23, 22:50 (GMT + 9):
Sea Harvest achieves strong growth in H1
Peru
Aug 23, 21:40 (GMT + 9):
Horse mackerel and mackerel exploratory fishing authorised
Norway
Aug 23, 21:30 (GMT + 9):
Salmon price status at week 33
United States
Aug 23, 02:50 (GMT + 9):
Eclipse's high tides cause mass farmed Atlantic salmon escape
India
Aug 23, 02:40 (GMT + 9):
Technology developed to produce Indian pompano seeds
Norway
Aug 23, 01:30 (GMT + 9):
Norway Royal Salmon increases operational revenue in Q2
United Kingdom
Aug 23, 00:50 (GMT + 9):
Marine microplastics first time quantified in deep sea invertebrates
Mexico
Aug 23, 00:30 (GMT + 9):
Pargo-UNAM 'transcends borders'
Australia
Aug 23, 00:00 (GMT + 9):
IN BRIEF - Calls for salmon farms to stop seal relocations to North-West Coast
United States
Aug 23, 00:00 (GMT + 9):
IN BRIEF - Don Cuddy: Blue Harvest a major new presence among city fish houses
Laos
Aug 23, 00:00 (GMT + 9):
IN BRIEF - New facilities to develop aquaculture in Laos
United States
Aug 23, 00:00 (GMT + 9):
IN BRIEF - UWM researchers trying to put more perch on your table
Angola
Aug 22, 23:20 (GMT + 9):
Angola to resume canned fish exports after two canneries opening
Chile
Aug 22, 22:50 (GMT + 9):
Union denounces Norwegian shipping companies for 'monopolistic and protectionist' behaviour



Lenguaje
FEATURED EVENTS
  
TOP STORIES
Aquamar and LM Foods partner to create 'surimi platform'
United States Aquamar, Inc. and LM Foods, LLC have partnered to create a new platform in the surimi seafood market, producing and selling crab flavoured seafood to foodservice, food manufacturing, and retail channels primarily in North America.
Marine protected area creation worries the fishing sector
Argentina The plan promoted by the Ministry of Environment to create new marine protected areas in Argentine waters, where fishing activities are prohibited, has generated strong concerns in the fisheries sector, which is also shared by the Federal Fisheries Council.
Innovative technology and management measures improve ecological trawling efficiency
Spain Scientists from the Balearic Oceanographic Centre of the Spanish Institute of Oceanography, in collaboration with fishermen from the Balearic Islands and Cataluña, have evaluated different measures to reduce the direct and indirect impact of trawling in ecosystems.
Omega Protein’s revenues drop but trusts it can rebound in second semester
United States Nutritional product company Omega Protein Corporation experienced a 15 per cent drop in revenues in the first six months of 2017, to USD 167.5 million compared to the same period in 2016.
 
Maruha Nichiro Corporation
Nichirei Corporation -Headquarter-
Pesquera El Golfo S.A.
Ventisqueros - Productos del Mar Ventisqueros S.A
Wärtsilä Corporation -Wartsila Group Headquarter-
ITOCHU Corporation -Headquarter-
BAADER - Nordischer Maschinenbau Rud. Baader GmbH+Co.KG (Head Office)
Inmarsat plc - Global Headquarters
Marks & Spencer
Tesco PLC (Supermarket) - Headquarters
Sea Harvest Corporation (PTY) Ltd.
I&J - Irvin & Johnson Holding Company (Pty) Ltd.
Blue Continent Products (Pty) Ltd - (Oceana Group Limited)
Pesquera San Jose S.A.
Nutreco N.V. - Head Office
CNFC China National Fisheries Corporation - Group Headquarters
W. van der Zwan & Zn. B.V.
SMMI - Sunderland Marine Mutual Insurance Co., Ltd. - Headquarters
Icicle Seafoods Inc. -Headquarter-
Starkist Seafood Co. - Headquearters
Trident Seafoods Corp.
American Seafoods Group LLC - Head Office
Marel - Group Headquarters
SalMar ASA - Group Headquarters
Sajo Industries Co., Ltd
Hansung Enterprise Co.,Ltd.
BIM - Irish Sea Fisheries Board (An Bord Iascaigh Mhara)
CEFAS - Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science
COPEINCA ASA - Corporacion Pesquera Inca S.A.C.
Chun Cheng Fishery Enterprise Pte Ltd.
Food Project (Siam) Co., Ltd.
VASEP - Vietnam Association of Seafood Exporters & Producers
Gomes da Costa
Furuno Electric Co., Ltd. (Headquarters)
NISSUI - Nippon Suisan Kaisha, Ltd. - Group Headquarters
FAO -Food and Agriculture Organization- Fisheries and Aquaculture Department (Headquarter)
Hagoromo Foods Co., Ltd.
Koden Electronics Co., Ltd. (Headquarters)
A.P. Møller - Maersk A/S - Headquarters
BVQI - Bureau Veritas Quality International (Head Office)
UPS - United Parcel Service, Inc. - Headquarters
Hamburg Süd Group - (Headquearters)
Armadora Pereira S.A. - Group Headquarters
NOAA - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (Headquarters)
Omega Protein Corporation -Headquarter-
Marona S.A.
Marine Harvest ASA - Headquarters
Marubeni Europe Plc -UK-
Findus Ltd
Icom Inc. (Headquarter)
WWF Centroamerica
Oceana Group Limited
The David and Lucile Packard Foundation
Ajinomoto Co., Inc. - Headquarters
Friosur S.A. - Headquarters
Cargill, Incorporated - Global Headquarters
Benihana Inc.
Leardini Pescados Ltda
Mitsubishi Corporation Marine Products Depts. D.Team
CJ Corporation  - Group Headquarters
Greenpeace International - The Netherlands
David Suzuki Foundation
Fisheries and Oceans Canada -Communications Branch-
Mitsui & Co.,Ltd - Headquarters
Ocean Trawlers Group - Ocean Trawlers HK Ltd.
Natori Co., Ltd.
Carrefour Supermarket - Headquarters
FedEx Corporation -Headquarter-
AKBM - Aker BioMarine ASA
Seafood Choices Alliance -Headquarter-
Austevoll Seafood ASA
Walmart / Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. (Supermarket) -Headquarter-
New Japan Radio Co.Ltd (JRC) -Head Office-
Gulfstream JSC
INVE Group - Head Office
Marine Stewardship Council - MSC Worldwide Headquarters
Royal Dutch Shell plc (Headquarter)
Genki Sushi Co.,Ltd -Headquarter-
Iceland Pelagic ehf
AXA Assistance Argentina S.A.
Caterpillar Inc. - Headquarters
Tiger Brands Limited
Morpol ASA - Group Headquarters
SeaChoice
National Geographic Society
AmazonFresh, LLC - AmazonFresh

Copyright 1995 - 2017 Fish Info & Services Co.Ltd| All Rights Reserved.   DISCLAIMER